• HHS English Department Policy

    Plagiarism, Cheating and Scholastic Integrity

    Don’t use material from other sources without identifying it. Paraphrasing another’s sentences or paragraphs or borrowing another writer’s organization is not academically honest. Students must be careful to attribute work by critics or other authors.

    Any passages that are directly lifted from another source without attribution is considered plagiarism. Plagiarism is a form of cheating. People in the workplace who steal other people’s work often suffer serious consequences, including the loss of the job. Codes of Conduct at most universities and colleges allow for expelling students who submit material that is not their own work. Here at Huron High School, the consequences for plagiarism is an “E” for the assignment itself with the possibility of an “E” for the marking period. Repeat offenders will be dealt with more severely. Furthermore, those who assist in cheating and plagiarism will be treated the same as those who try to profit from it. You are cheating if you let someone copy from your test or papers and will be treated accordingly.

    What is Plagiarism and Cheating More Exactly?

    What we mean by cheating or plagiarism is simply passing off someone else’s work--thinking or writing--as your own. We strongly discourage cheating and plagiarism because they subvert the purposes of the course, the learning of the subject matters, and the acquiring of a sense of community through shared values and experiences.

    It is cheating if you read another student’s paper during a test, if you use books or notes when they are forbidden, or if you obtain advanced copies of the test to study.

    It is not cheating if you study together for a test, if you share each other’s notes, or if you obtain tests from previous years for use in studying.

    It is plagiarism if you copy or paraphrase ideas from another source without proper citation, either from another student’s paper or from a published book, article or website. Plagiarism means deceiving or misleading your reader not only about the source of specific phrases or sentences, but also about ideas and interpretations.

    It is not plagiarism if you quote the source of your words and acknowledge, in a footnote, the source of your quotation. It is not plagiarism if you indicate, in a footnote or within the body of your paper, the source of an idea you are discussing. You do not need to footnote ideas derived from a class discussion or lectures or from conversations with friends, but it might be a good courtesy to do so, especially if the ideas are not supported by your own examples or explanations. You do not need to footnote any general background works you read as long as you did not take specific ideas and interpretations from them to present as your own.

     

     


    AAPS Testing Out Q&A

    What is the cheating and plagiarism policy?

    Cheating and plagiarism involve passing off someone else’s work—thinking or writing—as your own. When you use material from other sources, identify it. Any passages that are directly lifted from another source—including another student—without attribution will be considered plagiarism. Reading another student’s paper during a test, using books or notes when they are forbidden, or obtaining advanced copies of the test are all cheating.

    Distinctions regarding “copying verbatim” versus “reworking material from another source” can be challenging. Paraphrasing another’s sentences or paragraphs or borrowing another writer’s organization is not academically honest. Err on the side of identifying the source of original material.

    The consequence for cheating and/or plagiarism is failing the testing out exam. Those who assist in cheating and plagiarism will be treated the same: all parties will fail any attempts at testing out.